“Participation TV” – Nam June Paik

Created in 1969, “Participation TV” employs the use of two microphones to manipulate a series of patterns on a TV set. The piece was miles ahead of its time, effectively integrating audience participation with what was considered a primarily one-way broadcast medium. Prior to the boom in interactive digital media in the decades leading up to the new millennium, “Participation TV” stands out as an early forerunner to the interactive systems that we now recognize as standard. Given that the work employs the human voice to function, it can be taken as a visual metaphor for the communicative power of technology.

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“Participation TV” – Nam June Paik

JASON SALAVON’S – “COLOR WHEEL”

Jason Salavon’s piece “Color Wheel” is visually beautiful. Physically the viewer sees a beautiful presentation of colors through many images. You feel a sensation of summertime coming over you. The piece was created through many of images merged into one image creating an image that replicates a color wheel with many colors. The images creating the color wheel consist of things like lips, flowers, eye glasses, and human heads. I believe that the viewer can take that we are all from different places, believe in different things, own different things, but no matter what we are all the same and can relate in one way or another. Thus all the images of completely different things blending together into a larger image. This piece is effective in showing we are all equal in one sense. Especially today in our diverse world this piece does a great job in showing we are all similar. colorw

JASON SALAVON’S – “COLOR WHEEL”

Olia Lialina’s “Anna Karenin Goes to Paradise” (1994-6)

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Anna Karenin Goes to Paradise, an internet based work by Olia Lialina is a narrative work that features undertones of explorations of the functionality of the search engine. This comedic net art installation contains several references to pre Google search engines. The work itself is featured on the website http://www.teleportacia.org/anna/ and is broken down into three comedic “acts”.

This work compiles several different disciplines as it explores literature through the use of inspiration drawn from Leo Tolstoy’s classic novel Anna Karenin, as well as search engines from the time before Google existed. Lialina’s interpretation of concepts of love and paradise are rather unique as they are displayed within her work.

One thing that I found interesting is the use of search engines other than Google in this work. Google is the most prominent search engine in today’s society. We use Google so frequently, and for me, Google is my go to whenever I need to know something or do a quick look up. I think the artists inclusion of other search engines when put in a modern atmosphere demonstrates a forgotten paradise. A paradise of “abandoned” search engines.

Ultimately, I think this work is successful. Not only is it aesthetically interesting, but it also displays a unique and deeper meaning that causes the viewer to think about those once popular and now forgotten search engines. The authors interpretation of the concepts of love and paradise transfixed with the idea of search engines proposes a unique concept for the viewer to consider.

Olia Lialina’s “Anna Karenin Goes to Paradise” (1994-6)

The Unreliable Archivist by Janet Cohen, Keith Frank, and Jon Ippolito.

When it comes to digital art, even the way that the art is stored can be artwork in itself. The Unreliable Archivist is a project that was originally coded into Netscape 4 as a tongue in cheek archive unreliable archivist

When the archive is opened, oddity is what expels from it. There is a grainy screen with a small image and off to the left are a collection of sliders. The sliders decide whether the object being affected will be plain, enigmatic, loaded, or preposterous. This can change anything from the background to the words that caption the images. And as one can guess, the things being changed go from believable to just downright weird.

The creators of this archive were certainly trying to say something about the arbitrary things that can happen to art. It’s placement online can affect how it’s interpreted as well as suggestion from captions. The user even has the ability to arbitrarily change the settings on the art. The artists were making a statement about the arbitrary assignment of value to art and using silly phrases and images to demonstrate this.

The artwork is certainly effective in being weird and calling out that art has many interpretations. Every user that goes onto the site will interpret the captions and pictures differently, even if they are the same each time.

The Unreliable Archivist by Janet Cohen, Keith Frank, and Jon Ippolito.

Man Bartlett’s #24hEcho

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#24hEcho is an social media driven installation that was made and performed by Man Bartlett in 2010. Man Bartlett is a social media artist, he utilizes multiple sites and applications to conduct pieces or art. This installation consisted of Bartlett sitting on his computer for 24 hours and rewrote every tweet that had the hashtag #24hEcho. This installation was made on two mediums, in the physical world and the world-wide web. People could go see him in person to watch this piece or they could follow the feed of Bartlett. This piece give the viewer or the participator a feeling of recoil or “Echo”. It helps them realize that when they send a tweet it just does not end or go nowhere. Bartlett sent everyone their tweet back to show that everything that is posted goes somewhere for someone to read. It made Twitter that much more interactive as he acted like an auto reply machine.

https://nm12012758.wordpress.com/2014/04/22/24hecho/

Man Bartlett’s #24hEcho

Mark Napier | net.flag

net.flag is a web application currently owned by the Guggenheim and designed by Mark Napier that allows users to create a variety of different flag designs based on their own personal preferences. The work is hosted on a web page and accessible to virtually anyone. The idea is that the interactivity and connectivity of the internet allows for the erosion of cultural and geographical barriers. In this way the “flag of the internet” is not merely one design, but a multitude of designs unique to each inhabitant of the greater web nation. I feel the work is effective in accurately conveying the decentralization and individualization that  internet access has begun to foster. There is no authority as to who flag is superior or “official”. The internet is the new great equalizer, melding voices from different backgrounds regardless of distance, giving everyone a voice, and even the smallest groups or individuals the power to make an impact.

Mark Napier | net.flag

Pockets Full of Memories by George Legrady

Pockets Full of Memories was created by George Legrady between 2003-6. It was a installation that involved a data collection kiosk and addressed notions of the archive, memory and audience involvement in the production of digital works. He involved the audience in the development of the database. He did this by inviting them to scan their personal items and then ponder the concept of a communal archive and the way in which collective memory functions. people took digital photos of objects and then labeled them with keywords or tags. These keywords or tags are what is known as ‘metadata’. This art work symbolizes the capacity of digital technologies to democratize the creation and distribution of art. The views of this artwork were active participants in and contributors to the installation. It shows how digital art practices can catalyze a shift from the creator’s absolute control of the art object to a joint responsibility for the artwork that is negotiated between creator and participant.

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Pockets Full of Memories by George Legrady