“The Eternal Frame” (1975)

“The Eternal Frame” is a reenactment video made by two artist groups from San Francisco in 1975. The two groups,  T.R. Uthco and Ant Farm produced and reenacted the assassination of President John F. Kennedy from 1963. They were going for two main messages from this piece. The first was that such an event could never be reenacted and the second being how our media reacted on the situations and what they focused on. What made this piece go one step further is the level of detail that was put into the video. The creators were trying to make a statement on how we live our lives constantly paying attention to our media and how it almost gains control over how we think and feel.    

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“The Eternal Frame” (1975)

Man Bartlett’s #24hEcho

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#24hEcho is an social media driven installation that was made and performed by Man Bartlett in 2010. Man Bartlett is a social media artist, he utilizes multiple sites and applications to conduct pieces or art. This installation consisted of Bartlett sitting on his computer for 24 hours and rewrote every tweet that had the hashtag #24hEcho. This installation was made on two mediums, in the physical world and the world-wide web. People could go see him in person to watch this piece or they could follow the feed of Bartlett. This piece give the viewer or the participator a feeling of recoil or “Echo”. It helps them realize that when they send a tweet it just does not end or go nowhere. Bartlett sent everyone their tweet back to show that everything that is posted goes somewhere for someone to read. It made Twitter that much more interactive as he acted like an auto reply machine.

https://nm12012758.wordpress.com/2014/04/22/24hecho/

Man Bartlett’s #24hEcho

Nam June Paik’s “TV Garden” (1974)

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TV Garden by Nam June Paik connects the digital world with the natural world. This installation surrounds the viewer as they walk through a garden of plants that are “growing” all different size television sets. The viewer is able to move about the room as they please and discover what each television displays. Nam June Paik made it so each television set is playing a different video and playing different audio tracks. This creates an overwhelming effect of audio and flashing visuals. This installation uses a large room, multiple television set that vary in size and shape and fake plants. This experience shows how older technology can be seen as almost obsolete. There are strong vibes of industrialization roots coming through this piece. I see how this installation can really pull in the view and create a unique experience that comes from the visual and audio displays.     

Nam June Paik’s “TV Garden” (1974)

Feng Mengbo’s Long March: Restart (2009)

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This installment is a very physical and visual piece that full incorporates the users and the audience. The physical aspect comes into effect due to the users ability to play the game via a wireless remote. Visual stimulation comes in when the the game is being projected onto two massive 80 foot long digital walls. The player had to walk with the character in the game as they moved through he 14 levels. The game was based on the oil paintings named Long March from the Chinese military campaign lead by Mao Zedong in the 1930’s. Feng made the game to closely resemble Mario with the level layout, block art and 2D animation. He also incorporated other aspects from famous video games such as Metal Gear and Alien. Coca Cola was placed into the game in many times in the background as a subtle shout out, and the main character uses Coca Cola cans as grenades/his main us of attack. This piece seems to play with the late ideas of Communist China and the reign of the Red Army. It is a way to look back at something that is seen as a blemish in China’s history and add a fun spin with multiple culture references.       

Feng Mengbo’s Long March: Restart (2009)