Pockets Full of Memories by George Legrady

Pockets Full of Memories was created by George Legrady between 2003-6. It was a installation that involved a data collection kiosk and addressed notions of the archive, memory and audience involvement in the production of digital works. He involved the audience in the development of the database. He did this by inviting them to scan their personal items and then ponder the concept of a communal archive and the way in which collective memory functions. people took digital photos of objects and then labeled them with keywords or tags. These keywords or tags are what is known as ‘metadata’. This art work symbolizes the capacity of digital technologies to democratize the creation and distribution of art. The views of this artwork were active participants in and contributors to the installation. It shows how digital art practices can catalyze a shift from the creator’s absolute control of the art object to a joint responsibility for the artwork that is negotiated between creator and participant.

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Pockets Full of Memories by George Legrady

Legible City by Jeffery Shaw

Legible City which was created between 1988-91, is an interactive piece of art work. This work is where the viewer navigates a city on a fixed bicycle. However the city is not realistic or physical reality. It is made of three-dimensional letters that change when the cyclist changes speed or direction. This allows Shaw to examine the relationship between the virtual and the real. What allows the person to change the direction and speed, is the handlebar and pedals of the interface bicycle. It uses a video projector to project the computer-generated image onto a large screen. There is also a small monitor screen in front of the bicycle showing a simple ground plan of each city. This is an example of installation art because it enhanced cinematic experiences and projection possibilities have demanded expanded options to present such work.

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Legible City by Jeffery Shaw

The File Room by Antoni Muntadas

The File Room was created in 1994 by Antoni Muntadas. It is an example of an ongoing public installation about the history of censorship. This work is an online archive of censorship cases dating all the way back to the banning of Socrates’ book. It has been characterized as “an organic initiative; its shape ultimately determined by the input of participants”. This art work provides a tool for discussing and coming to terms with cultural censorship. It prompts our thinking and discussion, and serves as an evolving archive of how censorship has been used throughout history in different contexts, countries and civilizations. This allows people to continually see the history of censorship without having to look at different data.

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The File Room by Antoni Muntadas

Robert Barry’s “Telepathic Piece”

Telepathic Piece by Robert Barry consists of a chain of thoughts about an artwork communicated to the exhibition by the artist. During Barry’s exhibition he tried to communicate telepathically a work of art. This is an example of conceptual artwork. When it comes to conceptual artwork the characteristics that exhibit are evanescence, irony, satire, and self-reflexiveness. Because all of the artwork is done telepathically there is a different feeling the author wants to portray. When most art has a feeling to it doing it telepathically is much harder. What the author wants the viewer to take away is how he feels about the artwork telepathically. By doing the artwork he is telling the viewer a story telepathically without writing out the story. Using simple words and simple phrases is how he portrays the artwork. Doing the work makes you take away so much more than a normal piece. You take away knowledge from someone who could be economically, politically, and even a different gender than you. It is effective because it is making the view look through different eyes rather than their own.

Robert Barry’s “Telepathic Piece”